Introducing BookPal’s 2015 Summer of Literacy Program!

Summer of Literacy

Find out how you can get free teaching materials and win books all summer long.

To support literacy education, BookPal is hosting book giveaways and providing exclusive teaching materials to our social media followers. From July 1 through September 16, BookPal will be giving away books and free materials for teachers! Here’s a look at what’s coming up this month:

July 8th: Learn how to master lesson planning with our free “How To Build the Perfect Lesson Plan” eBook! Filled with 8 printable templates, tips from teachers across the country, and direct links to additional online resources, this is the only lesson planning guide you’ll ever need.

July 15th: Get book-themed activities and lesson plans for your classroom! We’re rounding up our favorite book-themed crafts, activities and lessons for you on the blog. You’ll also have a chance to win a set of elementary chapter books for your kids.

July 22: Help your kids learn more from the books they are reading with our “Reading Journal Starter Kit.” The free kit includes everything you need to encourage reading comprehension: downloadable reading logs, activity sheets, assessment materials, and more!

July 29: Discover new tips & tricks for classroom management. We’re presenting the best, most popular trending ideas on classroom management in one convenient blog post! This week, we’ll also be giving away a set of books from Kagan on cooperative learning and common core activities.

learn more

Enter for a chance to win picture books for your students.

This week, we’re giving away a set of 15+ picture books to one lucky winner! To enter, leave a comment on this post describing how you’ve seen books impact the lives of your students.summer of literacy giveaway

49 Responses to “Introducing BookPal’s 2015 Summer of Literacy Program!”

  1. Colleen F

    A classroom can never have enough books! I love having book talks and watching my students get so involved with the characters!

    Reply
  2. Lorene desjardins

    I teach special needs students and all genres of books are a must for my classroom. They help to expose my students to things and places they have. O previous knowledge of.

    Reply
  3. Julie Ahern

    Once you find a series that a non-reader loves, there’s no stopping them! I live for these moments!

    Reply
  4. Jessica Dockins

    A classroom can never have too many books. One book can have a different meaning for each student in my classroom. They can mean an escape, a cheer-me-up, a bravery booster, a good laugh, and so many more!

    Reply
  5. Cindy Reyes

    I’ve seen books transform the way my students look at reading and math or science. Usually, they want to think that they’re not reading when we’re working on science and math, but then come to love the books that we read about them.

    Reply
  6. Amy

    One of my favorite ways that books impact my students is when I find a just-right read aloud and students who think they hate books/reading start out sitting at the back of the room when I start reading… Then inch closer each day… And eventually join into passionate conversations about the book (or about real-life connections to the book) with me and/or fellow students.

    Reply
  7. Debra G

    Books are fantastic for children to associate with similar aspects of their own lives.

    Reply
  8. Lori W

    There is nothing better than seeing the look on my students faces when they see new books in the classroom. Students soon find their favorites and share with their friends. Thank you for the opportunity to further enforce the love of reading.

    Reply
  9. Annie Sample

    Picture books have opened worlds of wonder to beginning readers and struggling readers. From the pictures, I’ve seen these students decipher the main idea of the page content without having to read the actual unknown words. This encourages creativity in storytelling and encourages reluctant readers to continue to attempt to decode unknown words to match the story told with the pictures. Picture books are essential resources in the younger elementary grades and I rely on them regularly in lesson planning. Thank you for the opportunity to receive new books!

    Reply
  10. Gregory L Barrett

    July 1, 2015
    Praise The Lord Jesus Christ for his allowing me to read at my Grandma Ollie B. Barrett’s
    Memorial service she was 89 yrs old a beautiful Christian woman who loved children and teaching the need to have Jesus Christ in your life

    Reply
  11. Pam B

    Mentor texts really help kids with their writing and helping with understanding of new topics.

    Reply
  12. Joanne M.

    Books can help children find their interests, and bring a voice to those who cannot speak.

    Reply
  13. Dayna

    My students love books! I teach in a self-contained 6:1:3 classroom. During break times, they can choose between a book or a puzzle, my students almost always choose a book. They try to tell stories using the pictures! Some are even starting to read some of the words!

    Reply
  14. Maureen Healy

    My students this past school year loved the Little Critter book series. I saw them taking the books out of our school library to read at their leisure and to their younger siblings.

    Reply
  15. Ronda Waltob

    Picture books are the key to the stages of reading
    First to read to a child for enjoyment. Then they begin to look at pictures, retelling the story in their own words. Followed by their reading the actually words.
    Books are important to show children thar reading is important and can be fun.

    Reply
  16. Roy

    Kids who say they hate to read that find that one special book and then they are hooked. It’s priceless

    Reply
  17. Niki Rowland

    I love when my 2nd graders reference a favorite book character when trying to solve a problem.

    Reply
  18. Rhonda Peña

    Our students beg for time to read independently each and every day! It is so heartwarming to see their love grow as they devour book after book, share their favorite books with a friend, and recommend books to each other. You can just see the excitement in their eyes as they are reading!

    Reply
  19. Ashley

    Books have greatly impacted my students lives! My students love picking up a book and learning more. I even got my students excited about nonfiction by bringing in National Geographic Kids books and sharing my excitement for learning with my class. They loved it! Soon, they were absorbed reading the books and sharing cool facts with each other. I like getting my class excited about reading and learning! These picture books be a HUGE help in my classroom with our classroom library. They would be used in read alouds and independent reading, be incorporated into lessons and help with exploring our imagination!

    Reply
  20. Julie Weaver

    Books have helped me make difficult content easier to understand. My students always seem to struggle with understanding Place Value, but with the help of awesome picture books, I can make it understandable.

    Reply
  21. Elizabeth M.

    I teach 2/3 self contained. My kids love to read and listen to books. Several times they have been so excited to here a story that after we read it in class they find it in the library to read themselves. This is pa major goal for them especially for chapter books.

    Reply
  22. Robyn B

    My Sp Ed students love to be read to and to read books at their level.

    Reply
  23. Diane Richards

    It is awesome to see young readers sit next to each other, holding and reading a beautiful, colorful book together. They are so engaged!

    Reply
  24. Twila

    I love it when kids read a book and then want to draw their own book based on the story

    Reply
  25. Katie N

    Books have made such a huge impact on my students. I have started having them read at the beginning of every class period instead of as homework and they have really started to develop a love of reading.

    The most powerful impact I have seen is when students start to recommend books to each other! They are doing all the encouraging and it is wonderful!

    Reply
  26. Wendy Chaulk

    I’ve seen students who never thought they would finish a book read over 30 books in a school year because they discovered graphic novels. Other students get through a rough time because they find a book that has a similar situation and they relate to the characters…like One for the Murphys or The Bully Book. She kids love to write about what they have read and outgoing kids will sit and talk with quiet ones who have rad the same books. I love watching my students recommend books for each other and me!

    Reply
  27. Alisa P.

    I’m a kindergarten teacher and reading picture books to my class is a daily event. It is the foundation of literacy development. There are so many lessons learned everyday from books whether it is about reading comprehension, vocabulary development, or social issues such as bullying.

    Reply
    • Elizabeth Lee

      We had to reselect our winner for this giveaway, and I’m pleased to inform you that you’re the new winner of our first Summer of Literacy giveaway! Please email promotions@book-pal.com with your shipping address by Tuesday (7/28) to claim your prize.

      Thank you!

      Reply
  28. Kayleigh

    I love the stories and questions that come from reading! Students find ways to connect the characters to their own lives and love to tell their classmates and teachers about these connections. I also love when students find a word or topic we’ve talked about in another area (science, math, social studies, etc.) in the book they’re reading. They’re eager to run up and show me what they’ve found. Thank you for this opportunity! These would make a huge difference in this first year teacher’s room!

    Reply
  29. Sonja Solomon

    Books open the world to my Title 1 Grade 2 students. One of my students this past year went from dreaming of visiting a city 30 miles away to telling others by the end of the year that he IS going to China in a few years when he’s older and can travel. Since our school doesn’t have a library, I am always adding to our classroom library.

    Reply
  30. Shannon

    I have seen kids relate to a character in a book and feel that they are not alone. I love watching kids find a book that they can’t put down. I love to collect books to help my kids find the right one.

    Reply
  31. Sarah C.

    After teaching many seventh grade students from all reading levels this past school year, largely in the inclusion setting, I have found that books open doors for all readers of all walks of life. When we read “Freak the Mighty” out loud in the inclusion classes, students who told me through their words (and actions) they hated reading suddenly came alive and developed interest in the story as voices were given to characters and movements and behaviors were acted out in front of them. One of them told me “Wow, this is like a movie!” after we finished reading for the period. As more and more kids see reading as a chore, moments like this matter. Picture books, just like reading a story aloud, make it all come alive and make sense to many different readers. Showing them that reading can be more than interesting, but thought-provoking, and most of all, fun, is what keeps my excitement in the classroom. As a first year teacher, these books would do wonders for my students!

    Reply
  32. Sarah White

    Books make an impact every day in ways we might not even realize. I love that moment when a student seeks out a book that I have already read aloud. 🙂

    Reply
  33. Lynn Burns

    Talking about books opens the eyes of my students to new thoughts and opinions, and also helps them grow in their relationships to others as they listen to other students ideas and opinions. I often use picture books with my 5th and 6th grade students to teach social stories that help them learn how to critically think of how their voice impacts others inside and outside of their world and community.

    Reply
    • Elizabeth Lee

      Congratulations, Lynn! You’re the lucky winner of our very first Summer of Literacy giveaway. Please email promotions@book-pal.com with your shipping address by Tuesday (7/14) to claim your prize.

      Thank you!

      Reply
  34. Tina Z.

    Books are a huge part of my life, reading every day! I try to pass that love onto my students. I see reading books impact my students everyday! I discover my students interests and find a book to match and then “loan them out” . My students remember that and when I see them out in the real world after they have moved on they rember when Miss Z loaned them a Biography on Cleopatra or a picture book of insects! Those are the memories I make with my students!

    Reply
  35. Ashley Slone

    I’ve witnessed books helping my students get through a rough time in their lives. I have seen three students over the last couple years going through deaths in the family and divorce. They would read books and connect with the characters. It turned them into readers. I love that!

    Reply
  36. Debra

    I love seeing children understand that books have humor and to laugh at the funny parts when they are reading by themselves. To see that lovr of reading start.

    Reply
  37. Nancy Frick

    I’ve had students who were hesitant to even go in our classroom library because they dreaded reading but when they discovered the variety of books, graphic novels, magazines, and non-fiction available they were avid readers by the end of the year. One student, a scientist by nature, decided he wanted to explore more about volcanoes. He brought in, on his own, a volcano project. There are so many instances in which students found their passion through books.

    Reply
  38. P. Nettleship

    Books leave the records of our history as well as teaching us about the roles of others in society. Books are so important that the historic museum non profit that I run has developed a library open to the students and researchers on the history of our ‘place’ since the 1600s.

    Books are so important that my 16 year old granddaughter founded a charity called Reading Around the World and spent the past two summers with her friends in Africa literally building libraries (remodelling, painting and stocking shelves with books) and the winters shipping containers of books to schools in Tanzania where grade school students are learning English as well as Swahili in their classrooms thanks to these libraries.

    Books speak to why we are a Civilization.

    Reply
  39. Cassi

    I love going on book hunts in both the classroom and school library with my students. Finding a good series to read and reading it along with a group of students really allows them to express their views on the books and let’s a group of students engage in collaborative reading.

    Reply
  40. Monica Grabowska

    New vocabulary words, historical events and people—all of these seem to be stored in a mind box labeled SCHOOL. I love the excitement and connections my 4th graders demonstrate when they come across a reference or vocabulary word in a book they are reading for pleasure. They absolutely light up!

    Reply
  41. Jeremey

    There is no better way to open and expand a child’s imagination than turning through the pages of our favorite books!

    Reply
  42. Gareth Payne

    As a junior high English teacher whose own life was radically changed by literature, nothing gives me more pleasure and joy than introducing young people to the new imaginative horizons and possibilities that reading allows. Nothing builds character, compassion, understanding and the philosophical courage to tackle life with the foreknowledge and foretaste of death for all in the same way a great novel can. I do all I can to communicate my passion for literature, my belief in its transformative power, to my students, but high interest reading books certainly help light the fire!

    Reply
  43. Fritz

    As a K-8 librarian, it’s amazing when you can’t keep enough books on the shelves. Always trying to engage students with new genres they wouldn’t even thought of reading. Once they are introduced, they are hooked and it’s like kids in a candy store. That’s when I know the love for reading has introduced itself.

    Reply
  44. K.Steve

    When a student has choice in what he reads- and then he ENJOYS it- the door is opened to a world of learning, and a lifelong reader and learner is born!

    Reply
  45. Stephanie Nesbitt

    Picture books are a great way to introduce lessons and teach lessons to every grade level. Pictures can serve as ideas, provocations and examples. My students are all EAL learners and some of them just love the books with no words to make up their own stories first in their own language and then with assistance they learn to orally tell their story to others in English.

    Reply
  46. Vanessa

    I love books. My kids LOVE books ! Its exciting to see how much they gain from reading good literature . I love it when my kids can connect to what they are reading .

    Reply

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